Characteristics of a Gifted Child and their Problems

gifted children at school All children face the challenges of growing up and fitting into today’s society. However, gifted children quite often go through these stages earlier in life and have the additional challenge of facing a world that is not designed to accommodate their unique way of thinking. It’s not uncommon for gifted children to be diagnosed as ADD.

Unusually large vocabularies for their age. This may lead to boredom at school and with their peers.

Ability to read earlier than most children, often before entering school. Being ahead of the others can lead to boredom, lack of motivation, cynicism and depression.

Greater comprehension of the subtleties of language. They may use words to manipulate others.

Longer attention span, persistence and intense concentration. They become so focused that other duties are forgotten or they stubbornly resist being interrupted.

Ability to learn basic skills more quickly and with less practice. They are impatience with others and dislike routine.

Wide range of interests. They may jump from activity to activity without completing any, appearing to be disorganized and are frustrated by lack of time.

Highly developed curiosity and a limitless supply of questions. They may tend to ask embarrassing questions and be excessive in their interests.

Interest in experimenting and doing things differently. They may be viewed as disruptive and uncooperative.

Tendency to put ideas of thing together in ways that are unusual and not obvious (divergent thinking). They may be very creative and not fit in with peers.

Ability to retain a great deal of information. They may be very sensitive and worry about issues of fair play, equality or truth, and they desire logic rather than tradition or feelings. They may be perfectionists or intolerant of others.

Unusual sense of humor. They may become the class clown to gain attention.

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