TV Series “Exploring Critical Issues” Delves into Autism and Asperger Syndrome

“A little knowledge that acts is worth infinitely more than much knowledge that is idle.” – Khalil Gibran

Dr. Robert A. Scott, Adelphi University President, the host of the television series “Exploring Critical Issues” will soon be discussing the topic, “Autism and Asperger Syndrome.” The purpose of the segment is to discuss the newest autism research and policies with the goal of bring awareness to this fast growing disorder.

Asperger Syndrome (AS) is much more common than previously realized and many adults are undiagnosed. Studies suggest that AS is considerably more common than “classic” Autism. Whereas Autism has traditionally been thought to occur in about 4 out of every 10,000 children, estimates of Asperger Syndrome have ranged as high as 20-25 per 10,000. A study carried out in Sweden , concluded that nearly 0.7% of the children studied had symptoms suggestive of AS to some degree. Time Magazine notes in its May 6, 2002 issue cover story, “ASD is five times as common as Down syndrome and three times as common as juvenile diabetes.” Click here to learn more about Asperger Syndrome.

Along with Dr. Robert Scott is a panel of four autism experts including Dr. Stephen Shore, Assistant Professor of Education at Adelphi University. Dr. Shore wrote the forward to my book, Life with a Partner or Spouse with Asperger Syndrome: Going Over the Edge?. He teaches courses in special education and autism at Adelphi University. In addition to working with children and talking about life on the autism spectrum, Dr. Shore addresses adult issues pertinent to education, relationships, employment, advocacy, and disclosure as discussed in his many books.

This one hour broadcast will air:

Sunday, May 8th

Sunday, May 15th

Tuesday, May 10th

Tuesday, May 17th

Thursday, May 12th

Thursday, May 19th

“Autism and Asperger Syndrome” can be viewed online at www.telecaretv.org.

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